Revenue

Embracing Flat Rates

For an urgent care operator, shifting reimbursement models and financial management can be a nightmare. As the industry shifts further and further from fee-for-service to flat rates, urgent care clinics must have the tough conversations about the challenges associated with this kind of change. While contracting for a flat rate isn’t a revenue magic bullet, it provides predictable revenue, it streamlines billing, and it’s lucrative for ...

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Past Due: Outsourcing Debt Collection Increases Your Bottom Line

For Ridgeview Medical Center, using a third-party debt collection agency to recover overdue patient accounts isn’t a luxury. It’s a necessity. “Aged accounts is a numbers game,” says Tony Rinkenberger, Ridgeview’s director of revenue cycle services. Rinkenberger says that collecting balances requires many calls, which in turn requires technology that facilitates high-volume contacts with patients. “This technology is not core to a healthcare provider,” he says, ...

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Marketing for June: Men’s Health Month

Photo: Freesek A Harris Interactive found that, although more than 80 percent of men surveyed could describe their first car, just 54 percent could remember when they’d last been to the doctor for a check-up. June is Men’s Health Month, and June 15 through June 21 (Father’s Day) is designated as Men’s Health Week. Urgent care centers can leverage Men’s Health Month in a number of ...

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Put Physicals Front and Center this Summer

Memorial Day is here, which means summer is just around the corner. For many urgent care centers – or at least those that aren’t located near tourist destinations – summer means a slowdown. Turning the slowdown around requires some creative marketing. One avenue to explore is putting the focus on kids. Summer is the perfect time for parents to arrange for their children to get their ...

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Partner with Employers on Smoking Cessation

PHOTO: THOMAS SIENICKI A study published in the New England Journal of Medicine found that people who literally bought into a smoking cessation program were most successful. University of Pennsylvania researchers tested two types of interventions, one where participants deposited $150 and then received a refund plus $650 when they were tobacco-free for six months, and the other where participants were promised $800 if they stopped ...

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California’s Shameful Medi-Cal Reimbursement Rates

The San Jose Mercury News excoriated California Governor Jerry Brown in anticipation of the failure of his revised budget plan to raise Medi-Cal reimbursement rates. The editorial noted that the Affordable Care Act halved the percentage of uninsured Californians (from 88 percent to 11 percent), but that miserly Medi-Cal reimbursement rates don’t help the 2.7 million new Medi-Cal patients. It called for the governor and legislature ...

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Flipping the Switch: Smoothing the Rocky Transition to ICD-10

In 1962, sociologist Everett Rogers theorized that adopters of a new innovation or idea could be categorized into one of five groups that form a bell curve: innovators, early adopters, early majority, late majority, and laggards. While we identify as a nation of innovators and early adopters, when it comes to ICD-10, the U.S. is indisputably a laggard. The World Health Organization endorsed the tenth revision ...

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Riding the M&A Wave: How to Know When to Sell

The urgent care horizon is rapidly changing. Once a veritable archipelago of individually owned clinics, seismic shifts in the marketplace – think Obamacare – have created an volcanic environment for urgent care mergers and acquisitions. Some have ridden the cash flow down the mountain, while others have cratered out. Tony Barber, CEO of Urgent Care Advisors, says that while the movement toward consolidation is here to ...

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Johns Hopkins Finds Competition Drives Antibiotics Prescriptions

Johns Hopkins reports that a study scheduled to be published in the Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy found that the number of prescriptions for antibiotics increases in wealthier areas of the country. Lead study author Eili Klein, Ph.D., says that the trend “appears to be driven primarily by increased competition among doctors’ offices, retail medical clinics, and other healthcare providers as they seek to keep patients satisfied ...

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Washington State Legislation Would Allow Transport to Urgent Care

KREM reports that Washington State’s House Bill 2044 would enable emergency first responders to transport patients to urgent care centers rather than to hospitals. When an emergency room visit is the only option presented to patients, they sometimes opt not to go and then call 911 a second time when symptoms persist. The Spokane Fire Department, which supports the bill, believes the legislation will lower the ...

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